St Augustine, a great Saint of the Church said “Our hearts are restless O Lord, until they rest in you.” The desire for God is written in the human heart, because humankind is created by God and for God; and God never ceases to draw all humankind to himself.
Any journey towards the Church is primarily a journey towards God. This journey towards God is found through Jesus Christ.
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Word On Fire Blog
  • St. John of the Cross, Teacher of Prayer

    Dec 13, 2019 | 01:00 am

    Tomorrow’s feast of St John of the Cross (1542-1591) turns our attention to one of the greatest masters and teachers of prayer in the history of the Church. His writings about the topic have depth and beauty but also a[…]

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  • St. John of the Cross, Teacher of Prayer

    Dec 13, 2019 | 01:00 am

    Tomorrow’s feast of St John of the Cross (1542-1591) turns our attention to one of the greatest masters and teachers of prayer in the history of the Church. His writings about the topic have depth and beauty but also a[…]

    Read more...
  • George Bailey, Meet Thomas Merton

    Dec 12, 2019 | 01:00 am

    George Bailey, the hero of It’s a Wonderful Life, is not a simple, good-natured cornpone from upstate New York; he is a man carrying a real bitterness within, that shows itself in little ways. A man who has had to[…]

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  • Revelation in Ivory

    Dec 11, 2019 | 01:00 am

    As grateful as I am that museums preserve Catholic art, I cannot spend time in religious exhibitions without feeling a certain melancholy. Stripped of their original context (church or chapel) and of their original viewers (praying Catholics), these works often[…]

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  • Boomer Wisdom: A Review of Bruce Springsteen’s “Western Stars”

    Dec 10, 2019 | 01:00 am

    Over dinner the other night a millennial priest asked me about some characteristics that define Generation X. I started by telling him that my generation was born between 1964 and 1981 and that we GenXers are significantly smaller in number[…]

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Wordonfire Bishop Robert Barron’s Sermons
  • What You Hear and See

    Dec 11, 2019 | 01:00 am

    On this third Sunday of Advent, we hear for the first time this season of the great figure of John the Baptist. It’s not really possible to understand Jesus apart from his precursor. All four Gospels compel us to come[…]

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  • The Messiah’s Work

    Dec 4, 2019 | 01:00 am

    Last week, I spoke of preparing for the coming of the Lord using the great image from the second chapter of Isaiah: the Lord’s holy mountain. How do we make this mountain the highest mountain? On this second Sunday of[…]

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  • Getting the House in Order

    Nov 27, 2019 | 01:00 am

    We come once again to Advent, the beginning of the liturgical year and the great season of waiting. Christian life has a permanent Advent quality, for we are always expecting the coming of the Lord. Now, Jesus came, he will[…]

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Saint of the Day
  • St. John of the Cross

    Dec 14, 2019 | 06:00 am

    Dec. 14 is the liturgical memorial of Saint John of the Cross, a 16th century Carmelite priest best known for reforming his order together with Saint Teresa of Avila, and for writing the classic spiritual treatise “The Dark Night of the Soul.â€�Honored as a Doctor of the Church since 1926, he is sometimes called the “Mystical Doctor,â€� as a tribute to the depth of his teaching on the soul's union with God.The youngest child of parents in the silk-weaving trade, John de Yepes was born during 1542 in Fontiveros near the Spanish city of Avila. His father Gonzalo died at a relatively young age, and his mother Catalina struggled to provide for the family. John found academic success from his early years, but failed in his effort to learn a trade as an apprentice. Instead he spent several years working in a hospital for the poor, and continuing his studies at a Jesuit college in the town of Medina del Campo.After discerning a calling to monastic life, John entered the Carmlite Order in 1563. He had been practicing severe physical asceticism even before joining the Carmelites, and got permission to live according to their original rule of life – which stressed solitude, silence, poverty, work, and contemplative prayer. John received ordination as a priest in 1567 after studying in Salamanca, but considered transferring to the more austere Carthusian order rather than remaining with the Carmelites.Before he could take such a step, however, he met the Carmelite nun later canonized as Saint Teresa of Avila. Born in 1515, Teresa had joined the order in 1535, regarding consecrated religious life as the most secure road to salvation. Since that time she had made remarkable spiritual progress, and during the 1560s she began a movement to return the Carmelites to the strict observance of their original way of life. She convinced John not to leave the order, but to work for its reform.Changing his religious name from “John of St. Matthiasâ€� to “John of the Cross,â€� the priest began this work in November of 1568, accompanied by two other men of the order with whom he shared a small and austere house. For a time, John was in charge of the new recruits to the “Discalced Carmelitesâ€� – the name adopted by the reformed group, since they wore sandals rather than ordinary shoes as sign of poverty. He also spent five years as the confessor at a monastery in Avila led by St. Teresa.Their reforming movement grew quickly, but also met with severe opposition that jeopardized its future during the 1570s. Early in December of 1577, during a dispute over John's assignment within the order, opponents of the strict observance seized and imprisoned him in a tiny cell. His ordeal lasted nine months and included regular public floggings along with other harsh punishments. Yet it was during this very period that he composed the poetry that would serve as the basis for his spiritual writings.John managed to escape from prison in August of[…]

Reflections